Patronat de Turisme de la Diputació de TarragonaDiputació de Tarragona
Terres de l'Ebre 
© Salvador Cardero
© Fons MTTE
© Salvador Cardero
© Salvador Cardero
© Salvador Cardero
© Salvador Cardero
© Salvador Cardero
© Fons MTTE
© Fons MTTE
© Salvador Cardero
© Salvador Cardero
© Salvador Cardero
© Salvador Cardero
© Fons MTTE
© Salvador Cardero

MuseumTerres de l’Ebre

Ethnobotany in the Collecting passions exhibition and Jardín de La Miliana (La Miliana Garden)

Ethnobotany studies the relationship between man and vegetation, and includes different applications and uses deriving from plants such as medicinal, ornamental, industrial or gastronomic.

The exhibition “Salvador Cardero and the Terres de l’Ebre Scientific Research group” from the Collecting passions cycle, shows work by ethnobotanist Salvador Cardero, which has helped him to create a herbarium with more than 1000 specimens, a wide range of photographs and recover and put into practice many recipes and uses of natural plants for curative and culinary uses etc., all within the Terres de l’Ebre region. This exhibition could be viewed in Terres de l’Ebre Museum until January 2017 and can now be seen in Ulldecona from 17 February to 5th March.

The Miliana Garden in Ulldecona is one of the most personal and most important works by Salvador Cardero, and this natural unique space created with a collection of live plants has two main aims; to be a farm producing ecological medicinal plants and a botanical garden focusing on decency.

The garden covering 15,000m2 of land, is irrigated with water from the Ulldecona reservoir, and includes four different areas: the first and largest is for producing medicinal plants, the second is for fruit trees, the third is an area for vegetables and plants and the last is a botanical garden where apart from plants from the collection there is also a pond for aquatic plants.

In this garden, Salvador cultivates and maintains approximately four hundred different plant species which have medicinal, ornamental, industrial or edible uses, and which, when grouped together are a collection of ethnobotanical plants. The garden has flourished with a collection of wild plants where possible, as well as exchanges with other gardens, or donations and plants which have grown spontaneously in the garden itself. These species have been reproduced and selected.

At present, this area is used educationally, where plants with ethnobotanical uses can be contemplated. There is also a great collection preserving almost a hundred fruit trees, including varieties which are unprofitable and therefore not used commercially and are at risk of disappearing. With the aim of stopping this loss of genetic variability, the garden includes species of loquat, mountain ash, acerola, persimmon, gingko, flowering ash, oro de risco, tilia, jujube, quince, elderberry, as well as old varieties of apple, pear, plum etc.

Another interesting feature about this garden is its design, which is in the shape of a mandala, whereby the flowerbeds and paths are designed in concentric circles and radial paths. This shape is represented in different cultures and religions such as Buddhist, Christian or Muslim and represents the universe.

If you want to visit the garden then please contact Salvador Cardero by email on:
salvacardero@gmail.com (only for educational groups).